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"After having my pets cared for by Dr. Price in Houston, DFW area, and now Abilene, I have to say she offers the Best Pet Care Anywhere!"

J. Kelly M. - Houston (Email Review)


Windmill Animal Hospital
2 Windmill Circle
(@ S. Clack, just north of
Regional Medical Center)

Abilene, TX 79606

325-698-VETS (8387)
325-698-8391 (fax)
info@windmillvet.com
map to Windmill Animal Hospital


Office Hours
Mon - Fri: 7:30am - 6:00pm
Saturday: 8:00am - 1:00pm

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"We're new to town and read the reviews for Dr Price and decided to Windmill a go. So happy we did! Their whole office from the front desk to the treatment and meeting Dr Price was 5 Star all the way! I know our babies will be well taken care of! I even had a technician help me out to the car which made my day as I had my hands FULL! Would recommend to anyone! "

Susie G. - Abilene (Google Reviews)



Click here to read what other clients are saying about their experience with Windmill Animal Hospital - Favorite Abilene Vets!



"This is the best vet in Abilene! I have tried countless other veterinary clinics and Windmill out-does them all. They value my pet and my experience more than my money, and they are always showing care and compassion to both my dog and me. They even call after every appointment, just to check-up and make sure we're doing okay! AMAZING service and incredible people!"

Kelly S. - Abilene (Website Comment/Review)

 

TIME FOR PET'S X-RAYS

back to Reminders

Our records indicate that it is time to take some radiographic images of your pet.  The most common reasons we need to do xrays of your pet are:  follow-up xrays to track healing of a fracture, survey xrays of hips and/or elbows to screen for dysplasia, and late pregnancy xrays to assess the number and size of puppies or kittens in the upcoming litter.  Since Windmill Animal Hospital has a complete digital xray system, your pet's xray images will be clear, detailed, and available for viewing within 2 minutes of the exposure.  In addition, we provide a cd-rom to go home with you, with your pet's radiographic images burned onto it.

Fractured bones take 6-8 weeks to heal properly, sometimes longer.  The only way to verify a pet's bone has healed adequately to allow removal of a splint or resumption of normal activities is doing an xray.  The usual tracking interval to assess fracture healing is every 2-4 weeks, depending on the type and extent of the fracture.  If the healing progress is unsatisfactory, the management of the fracture can be changed before irreparable damage has occurred.  If the fracture heals faster than expected, any external fixator devices or splints can be removed in a timely manner, before THEY cause long-term harm.

We highly encourage all clients who own large-breed puppies to have survey xrays done of their pups' hips and elbows between 6 and 12 months of age; commonly, these imaging studies are timed for when the puppy is under anesthesia to be spayed or neutered.  If a pup is affected with hip dysplasia or elbow dysplasia, the sooner we know, the sooner management can be started to help slow down or prevent joint damage.  Again, the only reliable method of assessing the conformation of a puppy's hips or elbows is through xray imaging.

Taking an xray of your dog or cat when late in pregnancy will indicate how many little ones to expect, and help reveal if there are any obvious problems, such as over-sized puppies or an abnormally small pelvic canal.  Knowing how many puppies/kittens are coming, and if there are any size concerns, can help your Windmill Animal Hospital doctor and you make decisions about whether to allow your dog or cat to go into labor, or to consider an electvie cesarean section.