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"After having my pets cared for by Dr. Price in Houston, DFW area, and now Abilene, I have to say she offers the Best Pet Care Anywhere!"

J. Kelly M. - Houston (Email Review)


Windmill Animal Hospital
2 Windmill Circle
(@ S. Clack, just north of
Regional Medical Center)

Abilene, TX 79606

325-698-VETS (8387)
325-698-8391 (fax)
info@windmillvet.com
map to Windmill Animal Hospital


Office Hours
Mon - Fri: 7:30am - 6:00pm
Saturday: 8:00am - 1:00pm

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"We're new to town and read the reviews for Dr Price and decided to Windmill a go. So happy we did! Their whole office from the front desk to the treatment and meeting Dr Price was 5 Star all the way! I know our babies will be well taken care of! I even had a technician help me out to the car which made my day as I had my hands FULL! Would recommend to anyone! "

Susie G. - Abilene (Google Reviews)



Click here to read what other clients are saying about their experience with Windmill Animal Hospital - Favorite Abilene Vets!



"This is the best vet in Abilene! I have tried countless other veterinary clinics and Windmill out-does them all. They value my pet and my experience more than my money, and they are always showing care and compassion to both my dog and me. They even call after every appointment, just to check-up and make sure we're doing okay! AMAZING service and incredible people!"

Kelly S. - Abilene (Website Comment/Review)

 

K9 FLU VACCINE, H3N8 ANNUAL 'OLD'

back to Reminders

CANINE INFLUENZA HAS RE-APPEARED, AND IS EPIDEMIC
DIAGNOSED IN 10+ STATES, INCLUDING TEXAS, AND AT LEAST 5 DOGS HAVE DIED


The "original" Canine Influenza:        H3N8   in U.S. since 2004

The "new" Canine Influenza:  H3N2   in U.S. since 2015--current strain causing the epidemic

 

  • HIGHLY  CONTAGIOUS:
    • spread by contact with respiratory droplets from coughing/sneezing, and other body fluids;
    • unsuspecting pet owners can bring it home on their hands/clothing/shoes and infect their own dogs indirectly!!
    • 3-7 days incubation
  • SYMPTOMS:
    • starts with sneezing, reverse sneezing, "tickling" cough
    • progresses rapidly in less than 24 hours to fever (102 to 105), lethargy, severe cough
    • those with a more severe version develop a very high fever (105+) and hemorrhagic pneumonia (bleeding lungs)--affected dogs require intensive care and many DIE
    • some lucky dogs have subclinical infections--no symptoms at all, but shed the virus in all body fluids for up to 30 days, thereby exposing many unsuspecting dogs and owners
  • WHICH DOGS GET THE MILD FORM AND WHICH DOGS GET SEVERELY ILL?
    • snub-nosed breeds, puppies, elderly dogs, and dogs with chronic health problems are at highest risk of the hemorrhagic pneumonia form of Canine Flu.
    • when a dog has CONCURRENT exposure to multiple respiratory diseases (distemper virus, parainfluenza virus, bordetella, and/or hepatitis virus) at the same time AND/OR a dog has been under stress (boarding, grooming, attending dog shows, etc.), that dog is at HIGH risk of the severe form of Canine Flu
  • TREATMENT:
    • supportive care (antibiotics, fever-reducing medications, fluids) for 2-3 weeks
    • about 10% of dogs with Canine Influenza die as a result of the infection
  • there is a vaccine available for each strain of Canine Influenza, no one knows how much cross-protection occurs
  • canine flu does NOT infect people

 

Which dogs should be vaccinated?

  • dogs at highest risk are those with contact with lots of other dogs:  boarding kennels, grooming salons, doggie day care, animal shelters, dog competitions/events, dog parks, etc.
  • snub-nosed breeds and dogs with pre-existing health problems are at highly at risk for developing the severe form of Canine Flu if they are exposed

 

What can be done to prevent canine influenza cases?

  • infected dogs should be isolated immediately, with a separate air supply
  • canine flu virus is easily killed by common disinfectants; pay particular attention to door knobs and other items people touch commonly
  • wash hands and arms thoroughly after handling an unfamiliar dog, and disinfect shoes after being in a possibly contaminated area
  • the current Canine Influenza virus vaccines reliably prevents Canine Flu:
    • start with 2 vaccines, spaced 2-4 weeks apart, then booster annually
    • for Windmill pets who have received the original flu vaccine, we can booster with just the new strain